Raspberry Pi 2 GPIO levels after shutdown

There are now many tutorials, Instructables posts, and even devices which help with adding a physical shutdown button to the Raspberry Pi. I want to build something that will completely and utterly shut-the-chuff-off i.e. switch the mains off. I aim to use a PICAXE microcontroller to handle this shutting off via a relay, but the PICAXE needs to know when it is safe to proceed.
I used a handheld oscilloscope to measure the voltage levels of the GPIO pins while the Pi was running, versus it being shutdown with the power still connected. The ONLY pin with a significant change in voltage is GPIO14 (TXD0) on physical pin 8. It drops from around 3.4 V to around 1.3 mV, so I’m hoping that I can use this to indicate to the PICAXE that the Pi has shutdown, or is in the process of shutting down and programme a delay of, say 10 seconds.
This could also work as a fail-safe such that only IF the level is low for this entire duration will it proceed with the switch-off.

4pin Raspberry Pi GPIO pin-out from Farnell, with annotations.

40-pin GPIO of the Raspberry Pi 2.

Skoda Octavia Door Courtesy Light Switch

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01a – Pop the mirror control console out.

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01b

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02a – Remove the door panel retaining screw from behind the interior door-release handle.

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02b – The door panel retaining screw from behind the interior door-release handle.

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04a – Remove this piece from under the handle before attempting to remove the window control console. The protrusions lock the console into the frame.

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04b – Window control console removed by brute force and ignorance…

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04c – Broken component due to previous procedure!

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04d – Broken frame (right hand side) due to the previous procedure.

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04e – Overview of driver’s door handle and window control console location. You can see the green clips that hold the console in place, along with the (broken) bar where the handle is. The black electrical tape is attached to the wiring to aid retrieval during reassembly.

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20 – Overview of driver’s door with panel removed. Note that the window is partially opened, and secured (just in case) with gaffer tape.

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21

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23 – Note the lock button and rod.

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24b – The end of the lock-button rod being unclipped from the lock mechanism.

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25 – Removing the (key-operated) barrel lock was a pig. The metal peg you can see at the bottom of the aperture rotates round on a cam, holding the barrel in place.

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26a – One of these screws operates the cam which holds the barrel in place. I ended up drilling a larger access hole to this screw as my bit driver was just too broad..!

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26c – The end of the cable that the exterior door handle pulls to operate the door-lock mechanism

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27a – The door-handle cable preventing the lock assembly from being removed.

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27b – The mechanism-end of the cable to the external door-release handle.

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27c – The connector which you probably can’t see yet, looks like this.

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27d – Removing the assembly now that the cable is free.

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28 – To undo the assmebly requires holding one of the sprung levers out of the way.

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29 – Separating the two assemblies.

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30a – Note where all the parts sit — Take photos!!

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30b

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30c – The offending solder-joints (by the connector) causing the problem.

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30d – That bush on the back-end of the motor had me foxed for ages when it fell off. Fortunately, I had taken a photograph..!

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31a – When re-assembling, watch out that this fork meets up with the corresponding lever in the next photo.

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31b – This lever needs to marry-up with the fork in the previous photo. This caused me to have to repeat EVERYTHING up to this stage again when the door wouldn’t lock!!!

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32a – Checking the whole system works correctly.

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32b – Push the latch (as if the door is closed) then pull the door-handle cable to test the lock.

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33 – Electrical tape used for retrieval of cables etc. Do this before presenting the panel back up to the door.

Skoda Octavia Door Courtesy Light Switch

01a – Pop the mirror control console out.

Skoda door courtesy switch

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01b
Skoda door courtesy switch

Dscf2525

02a – Remove the door panel retaining screw from behind the interior door-release handle.

Skoda door courtesy switch

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02b – The door panel retaining screw from behind the interior door-release handle.
Skoda door courtesy switch

Dscf2468

04a – Remove this piece from under the handle before attempting to remove the window control console. The protrusions lock the console into the frame.
Skoda door courtesy switch

Dscf2467

04b – Window control console removed by brute force and ignorance…
Skoda door courtesy switch

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04c – Broken component due to previous procedure!
Skoda door courtesy switch

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04d – Broken frame (right hand side) due to the previous procedure.
Skoda door courtesy switch

Dscf2531

04e – Overview of driver’s door handle and window control console location. You can see the green clips that hold the console in place, along with the (broken) bar where the handle is. The black electrical tape is attached to the wiring to aid retrieval during reassembly.
Skoda door courtesy switch

Dscf2474

20 – Overview of driver’s door with panel removed. Note that the window is partially opened, and secured (just in case) with gaffer tape.
Skoda door courtesy switch

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21
Skoda door courtesy switch

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23 – Note the lock button and rod.
Skoda door courtesy switch

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24b – The end of the lock-button rod being unclipped from the lock mechanism.
Skoda door courtesy switch

Dscf2485

25 – Removing the (key-operated) barrel lock was a pig. The metal peg you can see at the bottom of the aperture rotates round on a cam, holding the barrel in place.
Skoda door courtesy switch

Dscf2482

26a – One of these screws operates the cam which holds the barrel in place. I ended up drilling a larger access hole to this screw as my bit driver was just too broad..!
Skoda door courtesy switch

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26c – The end of the cable that the exterior door handle pulls to operate the door-lock mechanism
Skoda door courtesy switch

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27a – The door-handle cable preventing the lock assembly from being removed.
Skoda door courtesy switch

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27b – The mechanism-end of the cable to the external door-release handle.
Skoda door courtesy switch

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27c – The connector which you probably can’t see yet, looks like this.
Skoda door courtesy switch

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27d – Removing the assembly now that the cable is free.
Skoda door courtesy switch

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28 – To undo the assmebly requires holding one of the sprung levers out of the way.
Skoda door courtesy switch

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29 – Separating the two assemblies.
Skoda door courtesy switch

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30a – Note where all the parts sit — Take photos!!
Skoda door courtesy switch

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30b
Skoda door courtesy switch

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30c – The offending solder-joints (by the connector) causing the problem.
Skoda door courtesy switch

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30d – That bush on the back-end of the motor had me foxed for ages when it fell off. Fortunately, I had taken a photograph..!
Skoda door courtesy switch

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31a – When re-assembling, watch out that this fork meets up with the corresponding lever in the next photo.
Skoda door courtesy switch

Dscf2509

31b – This lever needs to marry-up with the fork in the previous photo. This caused me to have to repeat EVERYTHING up to this stage again when the door wouldn’t lock!!!
Skoda door courtesy switch

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32a – Checking the whole system works correctly.
Skoda door courtesy switch

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32b – Push the latch (as if the door is closed) then pull the door-handle cable to test the lock.
Skoda door courtesy switch

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33 – Electrical tape used for retrieval of cables etc. Do this before presenting the panel back up to the door.
Skoda door courtesy switch

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Skoda door courtesy switch

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Skoda door courtesy switch

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Skoda door courtesy switch

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Skoda door courtesy switch

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Skoda door courtesy switch

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Skoda door courtesy switch

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Skoda door courtesy switch

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Skoda door courtesy switch

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Skoda door courtesy switch

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Skoda door courtesy switch

Using your own domain with Gmail on iPhone

This appears to be a common snag for those of us using a customised email address or specific domain, but wishing to use Google’s fantastic mail servers.
I feel that it’s safe to assume that if you’re reading this, you’ve set email up before but can’t understand what you’ve missed…

…and the answer is nothing!

It all boils down to the initial set-up when we selected “Gmail” because that’s what we’re using. But by choosing “Other” instead, we get the extra options we need to set the ‘from’ and ‘reply-to’ email addresses.

So, all you need to do is, delete your current Gmail account on your iPhone, then start from scratch, paying attention to the screen shown below.

Photo

It’s pretty much the same on the Mac too, but then how often do you need set email up if you’ve had the same email address for over ten years..?